What’s SUP DOG!?

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Spotted Dog Yoga is proud to offer weekly “SUP DOG Paddle Board Yoga” classes in partnership with the City of Folsom!

Take your yoga practice to the water and experience a NEW level of challenge and exploration of the land based yoga practice you may already be familiar with! Our classes are open to all levels and are designed to teach the basic fundamentals of SUP Yoga. All classes will include a slow moving Spotted Dog Yoga style vinyasa yoga practice.

 

Check out the video below to see what SUP DOG is all about!

 

SUP DOG

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Kids Yoga Program

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Press PLAY!

Find out why kids LOVE yoga at Spotted Dog Yoga in this super cool YouTube video below! ♥

Kids Love Yoga

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Our Kids Yoga Program is so loved and has become very popular, that we have added an additional class to the schedule! Starting this Wednesday, Feb. 20th, Isaac Brown will be leading kids class @ 4:45 PM ages 8-14. Mark your calendars and we can’t wait to see you all!

February Teacher of the Month: Jim Sweeney

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Jim Sweeney is teacher of the month for February!!! Come check out his amazing classes if you haven’t already and check SDY’s schedule to book his classes early. ♥

Teaching Schedule:

Thursday’s @ 7:30 PM

Saturday’s @ 4:30 PM

Sunday’s @ 4:30 PM

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#spotteddogyoga #folsomca #coolyogapeople #eldoradohillsca

8 Holiday Gift Giving Ideas From SDY

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Holiday Gift Ideas

 

1. Hydroflask

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2. Shirts

3. Leggings/Shorts

4. Gift Cards

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5. Private Lesson

6. Yoga & Beer (1/27/19) at Grist Beer Hall

7. Hats

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8. 40 Days to Personal Revolution Program (Begins 1/23/19)

 

Play Hard ♥ Love Big

Transform Your Entire Day

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Guess what!? There are 10 little tweaks you can do to your normal morning routine that will greatly impact the rest of your day.

Researchers have found that self-control and energy are not only intricately linked but also finite (limited), daily resources that tire much like a muscle. Even though we don’t always realize it, as the day goes on, we have increased difficulty exerting self-control and focusing on our work. As self-control wears out, we feel tired and find tasks to be more difficult and our mood goes downhill.

So when is self-control the highest? In the most important hours of the day, the morning!

But does that mean I have to spend my morning hours just working? Nope!

The morning hours should be used for doing the right things which will help your energy and self-control last longer throughout the day.

“For the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: ‘If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?’” And whenever the answer has been ‘No’ for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.” – Steve Jobs

Ok so what should you be doing? Glad you asked.

The following tips will help set the right tone for the rest of your day.

 

1. Start with exercise

Researchers found that people who exercise during the workday have more energy and a more positive outlook. Getting your body moving for as little as 10 minutes releases GABA, a neurotransmitter that makes your brain feel soothed and keeps you in control of your impulses. Exercising first thing in the morning ensures that you’ll have the time for it, and it improves your self-control and energy levels all day long.

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2. But first, lemon water

Drinking lemon water as soon as you wake up spikes your energy levels physically and mentally. Lemon water gives you steady, natural energy that lasts the length of the day by improving nutrient absorption in your stomach. You need to drink it first thing in the morning (on an empty stomach) to ensure full absorption. You should also wait 15–30 minutes after drinking it before eating (perfect time to squeeze in some exercise). Lemons are packed with nutrients; they’re chock full of potassium, vitamin C, and antioxidants. Don’t drink the juice without water because it’s hard on your teeth.

3. No screen time until breakfast

When you dive straight into e-mails, texts, and Facebook, you lose focus and your morning succumbs to the wants and needs of other people. It’s much healthier to take those precious first moments of the day to do something relaxing that sets a calm, positive tone for your day. Jumping right into electronics has the opposite effect—it’s a frantic way to start your day. Exercising, meditating, or even watching the birds out the window are all great ways to start the day.

4. Eat a real breakfast

Eating anything at all for breakfast puts you ahead of a lot of people. People who eat breakfast are less likely to be obese, they have more stable blood-sugar levels, and they tend to be less hungry over the course of the day. And these are just the statistics for people who eat any breakfast. When you eat a healthy breakfast, the doors to a productive day swing wide open. A healthy breakfast gives you energy, improves your short-term memory, and helps you to concentrate more intensely and for longer periods.

5. Set goals for the day

Research shows that having concrete goals is correlated with huge increases in confidence and feelings of control. Setting goals specific to the day puts everything into motion. Narrow your goals down to a few achievable ones that can easily be broken down into steps. Vague goals such as “I want to finish writing my article” are counter-productive because they fail to include the “how” of things. The same goal re-phrased in a more functional way would read something like this: “I am going to finish my article by writing each of the three sections, spending no more than an hour on each section.” Now, you have more than simply something you want to achieve—you have a way to achieve it.

Getting your morning started off right at home is important, but it’s only half the battle. Here’s how you can maintain a productive tone once you hit the office:

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6. First, clean your workspace

Even though it’s a pain to clean right when you get into work, it makes a big difference to your ability to concentrate. A Princeton University study found that people who worked in a clean workspace out-performed those who worked in a cluttered one because clutter pulls your attention away from your work. In fact, the effects of clutter on concentration are not all that different from the effects of multi-tasking.

7. No e-mail until you’ve eaten three frogs  (Wait, WHAT!?)

“Eating a frog” is the greatest antidote to procrastination, and the most productive people know the importance of biting into this delicacy first thing in the morning. In other words, spend your morning on something that requires a high level of concentration that you don’t want to do, and you’ll get it done in short order. Make a habit of eating three frogs before you check your e-mail because e-mail is a major distraction that enables procrastination and wastes precious mental energy.

“Eat a live frog first thing in the morning, and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day.” – Mark Twain

8. Keep morning meetings on schedule

Meetings are the biggest time waster there is, and they can ruin an otherwise productive morning. People who use their mornings effectively know that a meeting will drag on forever if they let it, so they inform everyone at the onset that they’ll stick to the intended schedule. This sets a limit that motivates everyone to be more focused and efficient. Keep your morning meetings on time, and your entire day will stay on track.

9. Don’t multitask

Multi-tasking in the morning—when you have lots to do, tons of energy, and it feels like you can do two or three things at once—is tempting, but it sets your whole day back. Multitasking reduces your efficiency and performance because your brain can only focus adequately on one thing at a time. When you try to do two things at once, your brain lacks the capacity to perform both tasks successfully.

10. Finally, say no

No is a powerful word that will protect your precious mornings. When it’s time to say no, avoid phrases such as “I don’t think I can” or “I’m not certain.” Saying no to a new commitment honors your existing commitments and gives you the opportunity to successfully fulfill them while your mind is fresh. Research conducted at the University of California Berkeley showed that the more difficulty that you have saying no, the more likely you are to experience stress, burnout, and even depression. Learn to use no, and it will lift your mood as well as your productivity.

The trick is to be intentional about your mornings, understanding that a.m. hours are precious and should be handled with care.

 

-Dr. Travis Bradberry

 

Play Hard Love Big

Light Up! Teacher Training

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Spotted Dog Yoga’s “LIGHT UP!” is a unique and exciting 200 Hour Teacher Empowerment Program where you will learn to share yourself powerfully and authentically!

Whether you’re interested in becoming a yoga teacher or not, this program was designed to empower YOU to be a fearless and bold leader. You will be given the tools to let go of what you don’t need and recreate a strong foundation that will allow you to live to your greatest potential. This training will transform your life and leave you with a powerful new understanding of your true self and what you value from the core.

 

 

 

Enroll Here

Play Hard ♥ Love Big

Benefits of Prenatal Yoga

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Pregnant? Looking for a way to relax and stay fit during your pregnancy?

Perhaps you should consider prenatal yoga.

Prenatal yoga goes beyond the baby growing phase, it can even help prepare you for labor and promote good health for your baby.

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What are the benefits of prenatal yoga? I’m glad you asked.

Much like other types of childbirth-preparation classes, prenatal yoga is a multifaceted approach to exercise that encourages stretching, mental centering and focused breathing. Research suggests that prenatal yoga is safe and can have many benefits for pregnant women and their babies.

Research suggests that prenatal yoga can:

  • Improve sleep
  • Reduce stress and anxiety
  • Increase the strength, flexibility and endurance of muscles needed for childbirth
  • Decrease lower back pain, nausea, carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms, headaches and shortness of breath

Prenatal yoga can also help you meet and bond with other pregnant women and prepare for the stress of being a new parent.

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What happens during a typical prenatal yoga class?

A typical prenatal yoga class might involve:

  • Breathing. You’ll be encouraged to focus on breathing in and out slowly and deeply through the nose. Prenatal yoga breathing techniques might help you reduce or manage shortness of breath during pregnancy and work through contractions during labor.
  • Gentle stretching. You’ll be encouraged to gently move different areas of your body, such as your neck and arms, through their full range of motion.
  • Postures. While standing, sitting or lying on the ground, you’ll gently move your body into different positions aimed at developing your strength, flexibility and balance. Props — such as blankets, cushions and belts — might be used to provide support and comfort.
  • Cool down and relaxation. At the end of each prenatal yoga class, you’ll relax your muscles and restore your resting heart rate and breathing rhythm. You might be encouraged to listen to your own breathing, pay close attention to sensations, thoughts and emotions.

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Are there styles of yoga that aren’t recommended for pregnant women?

There are many different styles of yoga — some more strenuous than others. Prenatal yoga, hatha yoga and restorative yoga are the best choices for pregnant women.

Be careful to avoid Bikram yoga, commonly called hot yoga, which involves doing vigorous poses in a room heated to 100 to 110 F (38 to 43 C). Bikram yoga can raise your body temperature too much, causing a condition known as hyperthermia. In addition, ashtanga and other types of power yoga might be too strenuous for women who aren’t experienced yoga practitioners.

Are there special safety guidelines for prenatal yoga?

To protect your health and your baby’s health during prenatal yoga, follow basic safety guidelines. For example:

  • Talk to your health care provider. Before you begin a prenatal yoga program, make sure you have your health care provider’s OK. You might not be able to do prenatal yoga if you are at increased risk of preterm labor or have certain medical conditions, such as heart disease or back problems.
  • Set realistic goals. For most pregnant women, at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity is recommended on most, if not all, days of the week. However, even shorter or less frequent workouts can still help you stay in shape and prepare for labor.
  • Pace yourself. If you can’t speak normally while you’re doing prenatal yoga, you’re probably pushing yourself too hard.
  • Stay cool and hydrated. Practice prenatal yoga in a well-ventilated room to avoid overheating. Drink plenty of fluids to keep yourself hydrated.
  • Avoid certain postures. When doing poses, bend from your hips — not your back — to maintain normal spine curvature. Avoid lying on your belly or back, doing deep forward or backward bends, or doing twisting poses that put pressure on your abdomen. You can modify twisting poses so that you only move your upper back, shoulders and rib cage. Avoid inverted poses, which involve extending your legs above your heart or head, unless you’re an experienced yoga practitioner. As your pregnancy progresses, use props during postures to accommodate changes in your center of gravity. If you wonder whether a pose is safe, ask your instructor for guidance.
  • Don’t overdo it. Pay attention to your body and how you feel. Start slow and avoid positions that are beyond your level of experience or comfort. Stretch only as far as you would have before pregnancy.

    If you experience any pain or other red flags — such as vaginal bleeding, decreased fetal movement or contractions — during prenatal yoga, stop and contact your health care provider.

[ Excerpt from The Mayo Clinic ]

How do I choose a prenatal yoga class?

Look for a program taught by an instructor who has training in prenatal yoga.

Your teacher, Katie Clark, is a E-RYT 500 Hour registered yoga teacher, has completed specialized Prenatal Yoga Training and is a mom herself!

Here at Spotted Dog Yoga in a supportive class of soon-to-be mamas you’ll aim to boost balance, circulation, flexibility and muscle tone for a healthy pregnancy. Through postures modified for each trimester, you will work to open and strengthen all the right muscles to counteract the weight of your baby bump, striving to prevent the aches, pains and imbalances common in pregnancy.

Plus, you’ll pick up deep breathing and relaxation tools to use in labor, delivery and beyond into parenthood!

75 minutes, no heat

Bring your friends along too! Let’s make this a baby bumpin’ good time.

 

www.spotteddogyoga.com